You Could Have a Herniated Disc: Here are the Top Symptoms to Look For

Herniated Disc Symptoms

Unexplained physical pain in your arms and legs can develop into one of the biggest barriers to living an active life. Many of Dr. Michael Hennessy’s patients at Texas Spine Consultants in Addison and Plano, Texas, have a herniated disc. This common and painful condition results when pressure on the spine causes a disc to slip or rupture and press on the nearby nerves, most commonly in the lower back or neck.

If you’ve been experiencing persistent pain in an arm or leg, you might have an untreated herniated disc. Recognizing these symptoms can point you and Dr. Hennessy toward treatment — and relief — as soon as possible. Here are the most common indicators that you might have this painful condition.

Pain in your arm or leg

You typically experience pain in a leg or arm closest to the herniated disc. For example, if the herniated disc is in your lower back, you can expect to feel pain moving throughout the nearest leg. Common areas of pain in the leg include the buttock, thigh, calf, and foot. This type of moving pain is also known as sciatica.

If the herniated disc is in your neck area, you’re likely to feel the pain in the nearest arm. Pain will move through areas of the shoulder, arm, and the hands and fingers.

Sensations of tingling and numbness

Along with pain, you might also experience sensations of numbness or tingling in your impacted arm or leg. This is the result of the herniated disc pinching the nearby nerves.

A herniated disc in your lower back might leave you with numbness and tingling in the leg and toes. Patients with herniated discs located in the neck can feel numbness and tingling in the hands, fingers, and arm.

Weakness in the muscles

Herniated discs often cause nearby muscles to weaken. People with a herniated disc in their lower back might feel weak or unstable while walking or running. If the herniated disc is in your neck, you can feel unsteady when holding, lifting, or carrying items you could previously manage with little to no trouble.

Neck pain and spasms

If your herniated disc is in your neck, it’s also common to experience neck pain, most commonly on the back and side of your neck. The pain might get worse when you turn your neck.

Certain patients will also experience spasms that cause their neck to involuntarily twitch.

While a herniated disc can be a painful condition, many treatments can bring you pain relief that makes it easier to go about your daily life. Dr. Hennessy works with patients in and around Addison and Plano, Texas, to develop a personalized treatment plan. If you suspect you might have a herniated disc, contact us today to schedule an initial appointment.

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